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Sep 24th, 2017, 01:31am


Cross-platform BBC BASIC (Win32, Linux x86, Android, Mac OS-X, Raspberry Pi)

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Total results: 10


 1   Libraries / Re: BOX2D library for BBCSDL?  on: Yesterday at 6:46pm
Started by Richard Russell | Post by Richard Russell
on Yesterday at 4:11pm, michael wrote:
That would be cool if you did work on an physics engine for 3D. I will try my hand at it regardless.

I wasn't suggesting that I would do any work on the 'physics engine' itself - none is necessary really since Box2D already works with floating-point coordinates that are compatible with 3D rendering.

Quote:
You may want to talk to DDRM, as he just made a shapes library for 3D

He's a member of this forum (at least, he was) so if he wants to contribute he can. There is a FNshape() function, written by me, in opengl.bbc (in the examples/graphics folder of BBCSDL) which can create vertex arrays for spheres, cones and cylinders (in fact any shape that can be described by rotating a 2D function around the Z-axis).

Richard.

 
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 2   Libraries / Re: BOX2D library for BBCSDL?  on: Yesterday at 4:11pm
Started by Richard Russell | Post by michael
Quote:
If you don't attempt it I probably will!


I have already tested the button idea. It will work. Ill have an demo ready on Monday.

That would be cool if you did work on an physics engine for 3D. I will try my hand at it regardless.

OH by the way! You may want to talk to DDRM, as he just made a shapes library for 3D (he did it lightning fast in response to my endeavours. He is interested in this also.



 
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 3   Libraries / Re: BOX2D library for BBCSDL?  on: Yesterday at 3:34pm
Started by Richard Russell | Post by Richard Russell
on Yesterday at 1:54pm, michael wrote:
The only aspects that I would make 3D would be the spinning ball and the rotating paddles.

Ah, OK. I don't think anybody has yet used BBC BASIC to combine the Box2D physics engine with 3D-rendered graphics and that would be an extremely interesting project. There are no technical hurdles that I am aware of, and the result could be visually exciting.

If you don't attempt it I probably will!

Richard.

 
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 4   Libraries / Re: BOX2D library for BBCSDL?  on: Yesterday at 1:54pm
Started by Richard Russell | Post by michael
Quote:
I hope you realise that BOX2D is strictly 2D


Yes. The renderer, regardless of the coordinate system, doesn't effect the x,y coordinates of the graphics screen.

( I checked that when working the mouse presence for each screen)

The only aspects that I would make 3D would be the spinning ball and the rotating paddles.

If BOX2D physics coordinate system is only applicable to predefined draw controls, then I guess it would be not applicable because I am aware of the shared graphics subject.

(which I am working on a remedy for 3D button controls that would have mouse interactivity. So when the mouse moves over the 3D button, a button of different texture would move slightly ahead of the main button and reverse when the mouse was away from it.)

From what I have determined, adjustment in the 3D world can be 0.01 and -0.01 to the limits of the view (on the horizontal and verticle coordinates.

So it would be a matter of working out the conversion of coordinates for mouse control, as well as location of the 3D image in a 2D location relative conversion.


 
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 5   Libraries / Re: BOX2D library for BBCSDL?  on: Yesterday at 09:27am
Started by Richard Russell | Post by Richard Russell
on Yesterday at 12:41am, michael wrote:
look forward to adding some physics to certain types of games, like 3D pinball

I hope you realise that BOX2D is strictly 2D (the clue is in the name)! You could only apply it to a 3D scenario in very limited and specific circumstances, when the 'physics' somehow only applies in 2 dimensions! If by 3D pinball you mean that the only use of the 'third' dimension is in having a frictionless sloping surface, then yes you could possibly simulate that by scaling the gravity term.

Anyway, as I hope was clear, my question was specifically about porting the BOX2D library to BBCSDL. The support (albeit for a fairly old version) in BB4W remains excellent, using BOX2DLIB.BBC, BOX2DGFX.BBC and BOX2DDBG.BBC. Build your pinball simulation in BB4W first and then, if you are still keen to port it to BBCSDL, we can discuss what the possibilities might be.

Richard.
 
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 6   Libraries / Re: BOX2D library for BBCSDL?  on: Yesterday at 12:41am
Started by Richard Russell | Post by michael
After looking at the videos on BOX2D, I would be very interested in a tool that helps with the laws of physics.

I will have my next improvement to the 3Deditor on Monday night and look forward to adding some physics to certain types of games, like 3D pinball, which I really would like to work on once the editor is ready for small object designs.


 
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 7   Libraries / BOX2D library for BBCSDL?  on: Sep 22nd, 2017, 11:43am
Started by Richard Russell | Post by Richard Russell
If I were to port the BOX2D library to BBCSDL (which wouldn't be easy, given that the DLL was built in Visual Studio) would anybody use it?

Richard.

 
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 8   Graphics and Games / Re: Rotating marble maze game  on: Sep 21st, 2017, 10:19pm
Started by PatrickM | Post by Richard Russell
on Sep 21st, 2017, 12:10pm, PatrickM wrote:
Hopefully you should be able to play it on the amazon fire stick now, but let me know if there are any other problems that stop it from working.

It runs, but I misled you: I'd forgotten that the central button (in the middle of the navigation ring) - whilst generating the same GET code as Enter/Return - has its own negative-inkey value of INKEY(-73) rather than INKEY(-74). With that change all the 'spin' functions work as they should.

To make it fully suitable for the Fire Stick it would be necessary to add the ON ERROR statement that all the other Android example programs have. Otherwise there's no way of getting back to the main menu ('IDE') and it will instead exit to an immediate mode prompt. Not a lot of use on a machine without a keyboard!

Richard.

 
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 9   General Board / Re: Origins of BBC Basic  on: Sep 21st, 2017, 3:14pm
Started by michael | Post by Richard Russell
on Sep 21st, 2017, 2:38pm, PatrickM wrote:
That's very sad. I think BBC Basic is still relevant.

BBC BASIC is still taught in some schools (mostly in the UK but at least one that I know of in New Zealand) so clearly it is thought to be relevant by some educationalists, but I suspect a diminishing rather than increasing number.

I have sought to keep BBC BASIC relevant by enhancing it so that it has the features expected of a 'modern' language, but that offends some purists who think the language should be frozen at its state around 1986. Only fairly recently a thread appeared at the Raspberry Pi forum claiming that the only 'true' BBC BASIC is Sophie's version of that vintage.

This seems strange to me because ever since its inception as 'BASIC 1' in 1981 BBC BASIC has evolved and gained new capabilities, so why it should be thought that 'BBC BASIC V' represents the pinnacle of that evolution I don't know. A cynic might suggest that it's because Sophie herself ceased actively developing it not long afterwards.

Of course in recent times I have switched from developing the language itself, something which I abandoned a decade or so ago, to broadening the range of platforms on which it can run. Unfortunately that has failed to attract the interest that I hoped it would, probably because it has come too late.

From a personal perspective, I am finding that as my brain function deteriorates I am no longer able to program in languages like C or assembler, but I can still program in BBC BASIC. That must say something about its usefulness even today.

Richard.

 
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 10   General Board / Re: Origins of BBC Basic  on: Sep 21st, 2017, 2:38pm
Started by michael | Post by PatrickM
That's very sad. I think BBC Basic is still relevant. I had wanted to learn programming for years (perhaps some decades) but had never managed it until two years ago.

I think that BBC Basic made it possible for me to learn how to program. I started experimenting with BBC Basic two years ago, in RISC OS and on Linux with the Brandy interpreter. For some reason I found it much easier to get into than any other language I had tried.

Now today I'm starting to write programs in C, but I still do most of my programming in BBC Basic just because it's easy and convenient. I don't think I would have managed any of this if not for BBC Basic.

PM
 
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